Introverts are leading Communities

Panels are high chances to engage with a broader audience and throw some new ideas to steer debates. At a recent one with Community Builders, we wanted to test an assumption. We paused our conversation and asked the audience to raise their hands if they saw themselves as an introvert.

This idea became important to me over the past few years. I have been reading these sorts of articles for some time now (here and here). But I’ve also met hundreds of Community Builders from different countries and cultures.
The idea that “introversion actually helps people build strong communities” became a sort of theme in my head.

Our guess was right; most of the room raised their hands. We weren’t surprised, but they probably were — each of them assuming that they’d be singled out among others. I enjoyed seeing the organizers, my fellow panel speakers, and myself – all having our hands in the air.

We were a room of introverts, talking about building community. The one activity that forces you to speak with people and get them excited about your projects!

I have been thinking about this evening many times since and trying to understand what to make of it.
If Community Builders are introvert like me, how do I make their journey less painful than mine was?

Self-structure as a mean to balance our energy.

Talking about mental health.

Creating platforms for Community Builders.

“The Happiness of Community Building”

Last week, we hosted a Community Leaders Academy in Beijing with passionate individuals. Most of them had been to a Startup Weekend before and some were considering to host one soon. More importantly, they are passionate about helping the next generation of entrepreneurs. Our three hours workshop started with “The Happiness of Community Building.”

I didn’t have a firm idea when I came up with the title but enjoyed the sound of it. These two concepts aren’t often tied together. And in practice, Community Builders don’t think of their happiness as they act and help others. A perfect opportunity to bring some debates to the table. Community Builders are often super-connector, invited everywhere, and extra insightful on the situation. But my own experience interacting with so many Builders throughout Greater China is very different. Community Building is lonely and challenging. There is no immediate reward, and large companies rarely consider it a hard skill.

My goal with this talk wasn’t to share a few tips but share a broader perspective to get the conversation going. These weren’t to be done at an individual level but agreed upon among peers.

The first idea was to refuse to celebrate constant hustle and around-the-clock work. The 24/7 or 996 (standing for working from 9 am to 9 pm, six days a week) aren’t healthy and can’t last long – especially with a high-pressure environment. I was toying with this question: “when was the last time you got bored?”

The second wish that I had for the audience was to get connected with other Community Builders. It’s a population that has so much in common that you often feel being on the same level. There is a lot to gain by getting together and celebrating our wins and challenges.

The final message was to start acknowledging and talking about mental health issues. In many places, it is tricky to openly discuss being burned out, depressed, and/or having a mental illness. Unfortunately, Community Builders are likely to pay too little attention to their situation. But we do have the influence to take risks and start that conversation.

With enough time, I would have shared my own story. I would have highlighted how developing a discipline helped me reaching harmony. Luckily, I will have a chance to talk about this topic at an upcoming conference in Shanghai (link here).